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Vitamin C Foundation

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C Foundation Announces New Vitamin C Product Sodium Ascorbate


Vitamin C Foundation Approved® Sodium Ascorbate is now available. Their sodium ascorbate is made from DSM Nutritional Products Quali-C® manufactured in Europe. The fine powder is non-acidic, hypoallergenic, GMO-free, and 100% corn free. All Vitamin C Foundation Approved® products are certified China-free (Not Made in China). Sodium ascorbate is the form of vitamin C recommended by the late Dr. Robert F. Cathcart, III, MD, ready to mix for intravenous and intramuscular use.

Spring, TX, April 03, 2011 --(PR.com)-- Sodium ascorbate is a form of vitamin C that has been bound to the mineral salt sodium. Sodium Ascorbate is used for intravenous infusions, intramuscular injections, and is used orally to avoid the acidity of ascorbic acid by sensitive persons. As vitamin C, the basic properties and health benefits of sodium ascorbate are virtually identical with ascorbic acid, but the mineral salt buffers, thus lowers the acidity of ascorbic acid. The buffered sodium ascorbate may enter the blood stream more slowly than ascorbic acid when taken orally.

Sodium ascorbate is the form of vitamin C recommended by the late Dr. Robert F. Cathcart, III, MD for intravenous and intramuscular use. Vitamin C Foundation Approved® Cathcart's Sodium Ascorbate is made from DSM Nutritional Products Quali-C®. The fine powder is non-acidic, hypoallergenic, GMO-free, and 100% corn free. All Vitamin C Foundation Approved® products are certified China-free (Not Made in China).

Dr. Cathcart reported, “I have not had any trouble with sodium ascorbate solutions. I do not worry about the sterility of this because this solution is very bactericidal. I hear all sorts of weird stories from patients who have gotten their infusions elsewhere. I do not know if it is an acid problem (because ascorbic acid was used rather than sodium ascorbate) or whether some colleagues get carried away with what other things they add to the intravenous solutions.

“I think that there may be, at times minor troubles with commercially prepared solutions because of the following. I understand that the U.S. Pharmacopeia specifies that the solutions be made from ascorbic acid and then buffered with sodium hydroxide or sodium bicarbonate to a pH between 3.5 and 7.0. I worry that 60 grams of ascorbate at a pH of 3.5 is too acid. I know that Fred Klenner (the first physician who used high dose intravenous ascorbate by vein) also made his solutions from sodium ascorbate powder. The pH of this has always turned out to be 7.4.”

Dr. Cathcart describes how to prepare sodium ascorbate for IV at Vitamin C Foundation.org/ivc/civprep.pdf

or search for Dr. Cathcart on youtube.com

Intravenous Dosage Guidelines

One gram per kilogram of body weight is a general guideline, which would be about 20 to 25 grams for a 50-pound child and 100 grams for a 220 pound-adult. However, according to vitamin C experts, just giving most adults 50 grams at a time for most conditions works out well.

Rate of infusion can range anywhere from 30 minutes to 3 hours, depending upon comfort of the IV, the amount being administered, and the condition being treated (toxins, more rapid, infections, cancer, etc., less rapid). The more rapid infusions will often be associated with hypoglycemia, which can usually be easily addressed with a little fruit juice or even a candy bar. But it is best if the added glucose/sugar can be avoided.

Dosage is always empirical, as in give more if the clinical response, especially in infections or poisonings, is not adequate. Note: Ascorbic acid should never be used intravenously and can damage veins.

The sodium content of sodium ascorbate (113 mg per gram of C) may be of concern to those with hypertension or water retention problems. Interestingly, sodium ascorbate is used in intravenous drips where dozens of grams/day of sodium injected directly into the blood stream doesn't seem to be a problem. Recent research indicates that only highly refined sodium chloride (table salt) may be the real problem for heart patients. Sodium ascorbate is also routinely used as a sugar-free, additive-free, substitute for toothpaste (brush and swallow).

Vitamin C Foundation Approved® Cathcart's Sodium ascorbate is now on sale at VitaminCFDN.com/store. Physician and quantity discounts are available.

About the Vitamin C Foundation

The Vitamin C Foundation is a national nonprofit, charitable organization dedicated to preserving and promoting scientific information about ascorbic acid – vitamin C. Members and technical advisers include scientists, licensed medical doctors and interested parties from around the world. The Foundation dedicates its work to the memory of noted vitamin C expert and Nobel laureate Linus C. Pauling. Intelisoft Multimedia, Inc. DBA as Pauling Therapy Formulas and Vitamin C FDN are the exclusive retailers of Vitamin C Foundation Approved® products.

Quali-C® is a registered trademark of DSM Nutritional Products Corporation

Vitamin C Foundation Approved® is a registered trademark of the Vitamin C Foundation

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Contact Information
Vitamin C Foundation
Owen Fonorow
800-894-9025
Contact
vitamincfoundation.org

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